Month: February 2015

5 Qualities Every Leader Should Have

True leadership is defined by the qualities you possess, not by the position you hold. Here are 5 qualities every lead should possess.
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5 Qualities Every Leader Should Have

Leadership - Eugene ChrinianTrue leadership is defined by the qualities you possess, not by the position you hold. Whether you are the CEO of a successful company or simply an employee who others depend on, you are still a leader. Leadership isn’t a title, it’s a state of being. 

In a recent article published on Entrepreneur.com, David Hassell, CEO and Founder of 14Five, discusses leadership qualities that you should cultivate in yourself, as well as look for in others. 

Willingness to learn. Even once you have made it to the top and have proven yourself, it’s important to continue your growth. Being a leader does not equate to having all the answers and you should feel comfortable to ask questions. Additionally, once you are removed from the front-line, you are prone to become less familiar with day-to-day processes. Firsthand knowledge can potentially become less relatable. “Asking questions on a regular basis allows for uncovering great employee ideas and insights that might otherwise go unnoticed”.   

Intuition. In today’s data-driven world, most people weigh all the facts before making a decision. While this is not wrong, sometimes the data doesn’t lead to an obvious answer and you will need to trust your intuition. Take everything you know into account before making your decision but learn to trust your gut. “Once the decision is made, stand by it so that others will feel confident about your leadership”.

Ability to let go. This is a very important quality to have. Nothing is more aggravating or frustrating than having your manager constantly breathing down your neck. Employees who work under micromanagement don’t blossom and flourish. Furthermore, managers who aren’t capable of delegating for fear of not getting the job done, don’t ultimately get anything done. A leader needs to be able to let go and trust his team. Not only will this free up your time and allow you to focus on some higher-level tasks, but “it [also] sends the message that you trust others to perform in their own zones of genius”.

Adaptability. Picture this: you have created the perfect strategy and outline for your next project and something comes along to throw your plan off course. It happens; it’s as simple as that. A leader needs to be able to “fearlessly adapt to change and encourage others to be nimble enough to roll with the punches.” 

Encouraging. “As a leader, it is far better to inspire people to push against their own boundaries than have them shut down under demands and threats.” Provide guidance and motivation; be nurturing. It’s important to not just tell people what to do but to work together and define achievable goals and objectives.   

To read the original article and learn about additional leadership qualities, head on over to Entrepreneur.com.

from Eugene Chrinian Leadership http://ift.tt/1CW8fzU
via Eugene Chrinian

Viral HONY Photo Raises $1 million

HONY - Eugene Chrinian

(source: news.yahoo.com)

In the era of the internet, pictures tend to speak more than their usual thousand words. Social media has connected the world in ways that was once unthinkable. Today, in the dawn of Instagram, Facebook and Twitter, the world can no longer turn a blind-eye to everything that happens around them. Ignorance has turned into an increasingly difficult choice when everything happening around the world is a click of a button away. 

Mark Twain said “travel is to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness” and even though many of us do not travel further than the distance of work and back, despite its many faults, the internet has been a portal for people to not only see different places, but also to peer into the minds of those who live very different lives from ours. 

Brandon Stanton is photographer who roams the streets of New York City, talking to people he runs into and taking their pictures. His photoblog, The Humans of New York (HONY), is famous worldwide for Brandon’s gift of getting his subjects to open up to him and the raw honesty of his work is what has earned the humble Facebook blog its widespread fan following. 

Over the years, HONY has used its strong fan base to conduct  several successful fundraisers and social drives, but its most recent heart-breaking story that led to staggering donations stands testimonial to the power of the internet and the empathy that still somehow survives in the increasingly brutal world we live in. 

A chance encounter with 13-year-old Vidal Chastanet spiraled to a fundraiser that collected $1 million for the students of Mott Hall Bridges Academy in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Brownsville, which is considered one of New York City’s most dangerous locations. Vidal, who grew up in this is rough neighborhood, shared his experiences of growing up in a crime-infested neighborhood like Brownsville. 

For the teenager who casually mentions how he saw a man being pushed off a building nearby at the age of nine, the turning point of the conversation was when Brandon asked him who has influenced him the most in his life, whereby he answered it was Ms. Lopez, his high school principal. 

“When we get in trouble, she doesn’t suspend us. She calls us to her office and explains to us how society was built down around us. And she tells us that each time somebody fails out of school, a new jail cell gets built. And one time she made every student stand up, one at a time, and she told each one of us that we matter.” 

Nadia Lopez, with the goal of providing a better future of these kids has been working diligently to broaden the horizons of these children, most of who have never left New York. There isn’t much expectation from these children from their families or their societies. Most live in pitiful unsanitary conditions, hostile environments and even public parks and libraries are not safe for them. 

Lopez and the teachers of Mott Hall Bridges Academy have been attempting to raise funds to take its students to a trip to Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts so that the students can get a glimpse of what they can reach for and that their circumstances do not have to define them. When Brandon and HONY joined forces with Ms. Lopez, the school raised nearly $1 million, gaining the attention of the President himself, who invited Vidal to the White House recently.  

This sum is enough to sponsor the trip, fund summer programs to provide a healthy environment for the students all year round and for scholarship programs. The first recipient of which will be the sixth-grader, Vidal Chastanet, the boy who inspired it all. 

from Eugene Chrinian Charity http://ift.tt/1vm6Dzs
via Eugene Chrinian

5 Qualities Every Leader Should Have

Leadership - Eugene ChrinianTrue leadership is defined by the qualities you possess, not by the position you hold. Whether you are the CEO of a successful company or simply an employee who others depend on, you are still a leader. Leadership isn’t a title, it’s a state of being. 

In a recent article published on Entrepreneur.com, David Hassell, CEO and Founder of 14Five, discusses leadership qualities that you should cultivate in yourself, as well as look for in others. 

Willingness to learn. Even once you have made it to the top and have proven yourself, it’s important to continue your growth. Being a leader does not equate to having all the answers and you should feel comfortable to ask questions. Additionally, once you are removed from the front-line, you are prone to become less familiar with day-to-day processes. Firsthand knowledge can potentially become less relatable. “Asking questions on a regular basis allows for uncovering great employee ideas and insights that might otherwise go unnoticed”.   

Intuition. In today’s data-driven world, most people weigh all the facts before making a decision. While this is not wrong, sometimes the data doesn’t lead to an obvious answer and you will need to trust your intuition. Take everything you know into account before making your decision but learn to trust your gut. “Once the decision is made, stand by it so that others will feel confident about your leadership”.

Ability to let go. This is a very important quality to have. Nothing is more aggravating or frustrating than having your manager constantly breathing down your neck. Employees who work under micromanagement don’t blossom and flourish. Furthermore, managers who aren’t capable of delegating for fear of not getting the job done, don’t ultimately get anything done. A leader needs to be able to let go and trust his team. Not only will this free up your time and allow you to focus on some higher-level tasks, but “it [also] sends the message that you trust others to perform in their own zones of genius”.

Adaptability. Picture this: you have created the perfect strategy and outline for your next project and something comes along to throw your plan off course. It happens; it’s as simple as that. A leader needs to be able to “fearlessly adapt to change and encourage others to be nimble enough to roll with the punches.” 

Encouraging. “As a leader, it is far better to inspire people to push against their own boundaries than have them shut down under demands and threats.” Provide guidance and motivation; be nurturing. It’s important to not just tell people what to do but to work together and define achievable goals and objectives.   

To read the original article and learn about additional leadership qualities, head on over to Entrepreneur.com.

from Eugene Chrinian Leadership http://ift.tt/1CW8fzU
via Eugene Chrinian

Three Reasons to Run a Race for Charity this Year

Charity Race - Eugene Chrinian

(source: run247.com)

A recent article featured in the Huffington Post examines the struggle of the post-new-years-resolution blues. A popular resolution usually involves some form of exercise and getting in shape. You tell yourself the New Year is going to be your year – you set a goal and start off very diligently. However, something gets in the way, you start making excuses and soon the initial motivation fades. “Enter the charity race, because when your running become less about you and more about humanity, you can’t help but get out the door in the morning.”

Accountability

Currently, the only person keeping track of how often or far you run is you. Now that is certainly not a bad thing and in many cases that is enough. But for some, self-motivation doesn’t necessarily equal accountability. Enter public input. When you sign up for a race as a fundraising runner for a nonprofit, you will be required to solicit donations, which in most cases means reaching out to your family and friends across the country. This leads to one thing: Now that everyone knows you are signed up for a race, there is no backing out. Additionally, your family and friends are bound to be supportive and will likely come out to cheer you on, on the big day.

An entry into the big popular races

Gaining entry into a half or full marathon is not easy, especially as they continue to gain popularity. However, when you run for a charity, you are guaranteed an entry. You can find a list of nonprofits with guaranteed race entry on the race’s website. Or if you already have a charitable organization in mind, give them a call to see if they have a team joining the race.

It’s not about you

When you are running for a charity, it’s not about you. Sure, the act of running may have initially been about you (you started running to lose a couple pounds or just stay in shape in general) but after months of training and keeping at it, running may need to ultimately be about something (or someone) other than you. “There are hundreds of worthwhile causes, hundreds of cures to be found, and an abundance of awareness programs and platforms that all need your support. And when you are struggling to get a through a tough workout, fighting to just get the miles done, it helps tremendously to remember those miles have the ability to truly make a real difference in someone’s life.”

To read the original article in the Huffington Post, click here.

from Eugene Chrinian Charity http://ift.tt/1zF6iYW
via Eugene Chrinian

The 5 Keys to Successfully Manage Creative Employees

Team - Eugene ChrinianAccording to Nelson Rodriguez, Vice President of Global Marketing of Aquent and Contributor to Entrepreneur.com, managing creative employees can be challenging. It’s a steady balancing act of maintaining a nurturing environment that encourages employees to take risks and explore new directions, and pushing your employees to ensure work is produced on time and on budget.

Rodriguez seems to have found a happy medium and has come up with 5 keys to successfully manage creative employees without creating a restricting environment.

Make teamwork the priority. Negative feedback is always tough to give. Giving negative feedback to creatives is even harder. To make it easier as well as promote constructive feedback, focus on the value of teamwork as opposed to individual accomplishments. This way you aren’t singling anybody out; you are rallying your team to pitch in and collectively find a new solution.

Cultivate non-attachment. Encourage open mindedness. It’s important to remember that at the end of the day, they are creating for the business, not their own personal fulfillment. Also, realistically, whatever they come up with will ultimately undergo edits and in some cases even be thrown out. Rodriguez advises to “adopt an agile approach: Produce ideas quickly, provide timely feedback and push for rapid iterations of concepts.” This will make it less likely to become overly attached to ideas.

Hiring is key. Hire people that possess the mindset you need and can function on an egoless team. This can be tricky to find because you need individuals that are both talented and able to take constructive feedback when it comes to their work; someone who is open to trying new ideas. Key traits to look out for here are individuals that are keen on finding solutions and looking at a piece of work from every possible angle.

Don’t point fingers. The key here is to be consistent – in sickness and in health. You can’t encourage teamwork while things are going well and then point fingers and blame specific people when things don’t go as planned. You have to be all in when you’re part of a team; you share your success as well as your failures.

Customize your praise. This may seem hypocritical, following the previous statement; however, it is also important to recognize individual efforts. As much as people enjoy celebrating collective achievements, they also appreciate and deserve recognition for their personal contributions. Approach your team members to find out “how they prefer to be recognized and then show your appreciation appropriately”.

To read the original article, click here.

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via Eugene Chrinian